Services

The pelvic floor is a truly incredible system. Three primary roles of the female pelvic floor muscles are to support the organs of the pelvic floor (bladder, uterus, and rectum), maintain bladder and bowel continence, and assist in sexual function. When the pelvic floor muscles operate smoothly, most women don't think twice about this region of their body.

Row of people working out on treadmills
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Pregnant woman caressing her belly

However, things don't always operate as smoothly as we would like. For several reasons, dysfunction may develop. The conditions that impact the pelvic floor can be broadly subdivided into UNDERACTIVE and OVERACTIVE pelvic floor dysfunction. Underactive dysfunction includes: pregnancy, postpartum, aging related changes and muscle weakness. These often manifest as bladder incontinence, fecal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse (descent). Overactive dysfunction is associated with tightness of the pelvic floor muscles, which often manifests as urinary urgency, urinary frequency, constipation, pain with prolonged sitting, coccydynia (tail bone pain), chronic pelvic pain, and sexual dysfunction.

Many women don't know where to turn when they experience these symptoms. Sometimes, they may even feel too embarrassed to discuss them with their physician. MANY WOMEN SUFFER IN SILENCE FAR TOO LONG.

HELP EXISTS. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a safe, evidence-based, medically recognized specialty. It is a conservative approach that has helped cure both underactive and overactive pelvic floor dysfunction, and it has spared many women from unnecessary surgery. It consists of manual therapy, pelvic floor and hip exercises, nerve glides, and neuromuscular re-education.

PELVIC FLOOR PHYSICAL THERAPY MAY BE THE ANSWER TO YOUR PROBLEMS. If you can relate to these symptoms, speak to your physician to determine if pelvic floor physical therapy is appropriate for you. It would be an honor and privilege to help you along your healing journey.

Specialties

    Manual Therapy

  • Myofascial Release
  • Connective Tissue Mobilization
  • Trigger Point Release
  • Nerve Glides
  • Scar Massage
  • Manual Lymphatic Drainage
  • Craniosacral Therapy
    Neuromuscular Re-education

  • Biofeedback
  • Muscle Stimulation
    Therapeutic Exercise

  • Stretching
  • Strengthening
  • Home Exercises
    Postural & Body Mechanic Awareness